Call Toll-Free: 855-SUBSEA1  855-782-7321

    Copyright 2019 ​SUBSEA 20/20, Inc.  Seattle WA  USA   All Rights Reserved

Ocean Sonics Smart Digital Hydrophones

icListen AF Smart Hydrophone - 1 Hz to 12 kHz

The icListen AF extends the low frequency ultra low noise performance of the respected icListen LF up into the Audio Frequency range.

The AF comes with all the features of the icListen HF, including spectral processing, event detection, PPS synchronization, and the powerful Web Server available on the Ethernet interface.

 

Play deep-ocean sounds from icListen AF through your PC speakers using the Lucy software, in real-time.

Like the icListen HF, the new AF is compatible with many radio systems, including GSM, ISM and satellite.

 

Audio Frequency Applications:

  • Marine Mammal Monitoring

  • Earthquake & Tsunami Monitoring

  • Shipping Noise Measurement

  • Ocean Observatories

 

1/2
icListen AF Smart Hydrophone Applications

Environmental Monitoring

 

Sound is an important factor in the lives of many marine organisms and the human additions to ocean sound overlap the full range of animal uses for sound in the ocean. Researchers use hydrophones to study marine mammals and identify the thresholds of sound effects for each marine species and to predict how increasing anthropogenic sound will enhance the effects. 

Earthquakes & Tsunamis

 

Low-frequency hydrophones record the sounds made by undersea volcanoes and earthquakes. As the seismic energy from an earthquake spreads through the water it can set off a tsunami. Hydrophones are used to monitor for volcano, earthquake and tsunami sounds in various ways. They can be attached to an underwater observatory, lowered into the water from ocean vessels, attached to a float, or anchored to the seafloor.

Shipping Noise

 

Hydrophones serve as an education tool for researchers, scientists, and students to help build awareness of the sensitivity of the marine environment and the impacts of commercial shipping. Monitoring of marine acoustic disturbances, changes in ambient ocean noise, and the potential effects of acoustic masking with regards to cetaceans, will help accurately assess the effects of shipping noise on the marine environment.